Seminar – Nicola Grissom, PhD – “Think Different: The Importance of Individual Differences in Decision Making”

John D. Wiley Conference Center

Dr. Nicola Grissom is an Assistant Professor in the Psychology Department. Originally from Hawai'i, she obtained her undergraduate degree at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and conducted her postdoctoral training at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

Seminar – Jed Elison, PhD – “Towards a New Era of Early Autism Spectrum Disorder Identification”

John D. Wiley Conference Center

Dr. Elison, Director of the ELAB, is an associate professor at the Institute of Child Development. He completed his graduate training at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill and postdoctoral training at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests include the developmental processes and neural mechanisms that support specialized information processing, as well as the putative mechanisms that underlie atypical development.

Seminar – Randolph Ashton, PhD – “Bioengineering Human CNS Morphogenesis for Regulatory Science Applications”

John D. Wiley Conference Center

The goal of Ashton’s research is to bioengineering human tissues that can be used as tools or therapeutics to prevent or cure central nervous system (CNS) disorders. His lab currently melds state of the art biomaterial approaches with novel human neural stem cells derivation protocols to bioengineer brain and spinal cord cells and tissue models in vitro.

Seminar – Karen Adolph, PhD – “How Behavior Develops”

John D. Wiley Conference Center

Adolph is the Julius Silver Professor of Psychology and Neural Science, and professor of applied psychology at New York University. She uses observable motor behaviors and a variety of technologies (video, motion tracking, instrumented floor, head-mounted eye tracking, EEG, etc.) to study developmental processes.

Seminar – Gabriel Dichter, PhD – “Reward Processing in Autism”

John D. Wiley Conference Center

We are dedicated to the use of neuroscience methods to better understand psychiatric disorders. Research methods include psychophysiology, functional MRI, PET/MR, eye-tracking, and behavioral approaches. Our strategy is to first validate methods in non-clinical contexts, then to apply paradigms in psychiatric conditions, and finally to test our measures as potential mechanistic endpoints in clinical trials.

Seminar – Yong-hui Jiang, MD, PhD – “Modeling Autism by SHANK3 and H1-4 Gene Mutations: Synaptic Dysfunction vs Epigenetic Dysregulation”

John D. Wiley Conference Center

I am physician scientist active both in basic research and clinical practice. My research interests are to 1) uncover the genetic and epigenetic bases of neurodevelopmental disorders or rare diseases with neurodevelopmental defects; 2) model genetic diseases using human patients derived cellular models and genetic mutant mice; 3) understand the circuit and molecular mechanisms underlying autism spectrum disorder; 4) develop novel molecular and epigenetic targeted therapies for genetic and epigenetic diseases.