Seminar – Somer Bishop, PhD – Topic: Autism Spectrum Disorder Symptom Manifestation and Differentiation from Other Developmental Disabilities Across the Lifespan

Dr. Bishop is an associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Weill Institute for Neurosciences at UCSF. She is a clinical psychologist with expertise in assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Her research and clinical interests are focused on ASD symptom manifestations in individuals of different ages and levels of ability, as well as on differentiating between ASD and other developmental disabilities across the lifespan.

Seminar – Julie Lounds Taylor, PhD – Topic: Factors that Promote a Positive Transition into Adulthood for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Julie Lounds Taylor, Ph.D. is the Transitions Lab Principal Investigator (PI) and lab director. She is an associate professor of pediatrics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and an investigator at the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development. A major focus of Taylor’s research is on factors that promote a positive transition into adulthood for individuals with developmental disabilities, in particular those with autism spectrum disorder.

Seminar – Stephen Scherer, PhD, DSc FRSC – Topic: Understanding the Composition of the Human Genome for Studies of Genetic Disease

Dr. Stephen Scherer’s research includes understanding the composition of the human genome for studies of genetic disease built around three themes: 1) gene copy number and structural variation in the human genome, 2) determining the genetic architecture in autism spectrum and related- disorders and using this information to help families, and 3) developing infrastructure and capacity in Canada for translational genomics research.

Seminar – Carlos Portera-Cailliau, MD, PhD – Topic: Cortical Interneuron Hypofunction as a Target for Therapy in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Dr. Carlos Portera-Cailliau investigates synaptic and circuit changes in the mouse model of Fragile X syndrome in his lab at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, where he is on faculty. He has received grants from the NIH, the Dana Foundation, the March of Dimes Foundation, the Simons Foundation, and the John Merck Fund. From 2013 to 2021 he was the co-director of the UCLA-Caltech medical Scientist Training Program. He still sees patients in the movement disorders clinic.