University of Wisconsin–Madison

Slide of the Week

  • Kristin Slide of the Week

    Kristin Shutts, PhD – Slide of the Week

    Title: Social Tastes Sweeter Legend: Children were more likely to classify mildly tart applesauce as sweet (rather than sour) when they heard that the food was popular with other children (compared to when they heard that …

  • Shriberg Slide of the Week

    Lawrence D. Shriberg, PhD – Slide of the Week

    Genetic investigations of people with impaired development of spoken language provide windows into key aspects of human biology. Over 15 years after FOXP2 was identified, most speech and language impairments remain unexplained at the molecular level.

  • Kris Saha Slide of the Week 2018

    Krishanu Saha, PhD – Slide of the Week

    Title: Scarless genome editing of human stem cells via transient puromycin selection Legend: Transient puromycin selection enriches for precise homology directed repair (HDR)-mediated genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). hPSCs were electroporated to deliver …

  • Saffran Slide of the Week 2018

    Jenny Saffran, PhD – Slide of the Week

    Children use the presence of familiar objects with known names to identify the correct referents of novel words. In natural environments, objects vary widely in salience. The presence of familiar objects may sometimes hinder rather than help word learning.

  • Rosengren Slide of the Week

    Karl Rosengren, PhD – Slide of the Week

    Although folding a piece of paper might seem simple for adults, it requires a complex integration of skills that might be difficult for children.

  • Paul Rathouz, PhD - Slide of the Week

    Paul Rathouz, PhD – Slide of the Week

    Early diagnosis of speech disorders in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is of critical importance. A key problem is differentiating those with borderline or mild speech motor deficits from those who are within an age appropriate range of variability.

  • Seth Pollak 2018 Slide of the Week

    Seth Pollak, PhD – Slide of the Week

    Individuals who have experienced chronic and high levels of stress during their childhoods are at increased risk for a wide range of behavioral problems, yet the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this association are poorly understood.

  • Luigi Puglielli, MD, PhD Slide of the Week

    Luigi Puglielli, MD, PhD – Slide of the Week

    The aberrant accumulation of toxic protein aggregates is a key feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. As such, improving normal proteostatic mechanisms is an active target for biomedical research.

  • Denise Ney Slide of the Week

    Denise Ney, PhD – Slide of the Week

    Individuals with phenylketonuria (PKU) have a risk of cognitive impairment and inflammation. Many follow a low-phenylalanine (low-Phe) diet devoid of animal protein in combination with medical foods (MFs).

  • Albee Messing, VMD, PhD – Slide of the Week

    Albee Messing, VMD, PhD – Slide of the Week

    Title: Elimination of GFAP from the Central Nervous System (CNS) in Mouse Models of Alexander Disease Legend: A single injection of antisense oligonucleotides into the lateral ventricle of adult mice leads to nearly complete elimination of …

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