Jenny Saffran, PhD – Slide of the Week

 Eye-gaze methods offer numerous advantages for studying cognitive processes in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but data loss may threaten the validity and generalizability of results. Some eye-gaze systems may be more vulnerable to data loss than others, but to our knowledge, this issue has not been empirically investigated. In the current study, we asked whether automatic eye-tracking and manual gaze coding produce different rates of data loss or different results in a group of 51 toddlers with ASD.

Ari Rosenberg, PhD – Slide of the Week

Reconstructing three-dimensional (3D) scenes from two-dimensional (2D) retinal images is an ill-posed problem. Despite this, 3D perception of the world based on 2D retinal images is seemingly accurate and precise. The integration of distinct visual cues is essential for robust 3D perception in humans, but it is unclear whether this is true for non-human primates (NHPs).

Edward Hubbard, PhD – Slide of the Week

Approximately 1 in 20 people experience a kind of “mixing of the senses”, known as synesthesia. In the type of synesthesia we are investigating here, “grapheme‐color synesthesia” letters and numbers (collectively referred to as graphemes) automatically and involuntarily elicit color experiences (top section). This type of synesthesia affects approximately 1% of the population.

Randy Ashton, PhD – Slide of the Week

Transplantation of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived neurons into chick embryos is an established preliminary assay to evaluate engraftment potential. Yet, with recent advances in deriving diverse human neuronal subtypes, optimizing and standardizing such transplantation methodology for specific subtypes at their correlated anatomical sites is still required.

Bradley Christian, PhD – Slide of the Week

Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome; DS) leads to an overproduction of amyloid precursor protein and an increased risk for early Alzheimer’s disease. A study of the natural history of AD-related neuropathology is ongoing to gain an understanding of the distribution and time course of b-amyloid and tau burden in the brains of adults with DS.