Xinyu Zhao, PhD – Slide of the Week

Fragile X syndrome results from a loss of the RNA-binding protein fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). How FMRP regulates neuronal development and function remains unclear. Here we show that FMRP-deficient immature neurons exhibit impaired dendritic maturation, altered expression of mitochondrial genes, fragmented mitochondria, impaired mitochondrial function, and increased oxidative stress.

Cell component breakdown suggests possible treatment for multiple neural disorders

UW-Madison research published today (Feb. 11, 2019) reveals how one mutation causes fragile X, the most common inherited intellectual disability. “Fragile X syndrome has been studied as a model of intellectual disability because in theory it’s comparatively simple,” says senior author Xinyu Zhao, a professor of neuroscience in the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Marsha R. Mailick, PhD – Slide of the Week

The FMR1 premutation is of increasing interest to the fragile X syndrome (FXS) community, as questions about a primary premutation phenotype warrant research attention. One hundred FMR1 premutation carrier mothers (mean age = 58; 67 to 138 CGG repeats) of adults with fragile X syndrome were studied with respect to their physical and mental health, and motor and neurocognitive characteristics.