Waisman Investigators Receive Grant to Improve Brain Imaging in Young Children

A team of investigators at the Waisman Center was recently awarded a $2.5 million grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health to both improve brain imaging techniques for infants and build a quantitative atlas of typical early brain development.

Understanding Recovery and Development in Children

Early interventions in children with cerebral palsy can be pivotal to improving motor and cognitive outcomes. The focus of this study is to longitudinally assess, over the first two years of life, the recovery and development of the infant brain after early stroke or brain bleed.

Bernadette Gillick, PhD, MSPT, PT – Slide of the Week

Remote access to tDCS mitigates barriers to treatment such as location, time, transportation, and finances. While only 14% of Americans live in rural communities, they represent nearly 2/3 of primary care health professional shortage areas. Telehealth visits cost patients on average 54% less costly for an office visit. Time and travel are estimated to cost patients about $89 billion a year. 

Bernadette Gillick, PhD, MSPT, PT – Slide of the Week

Cerebral palsy is caused by a congenital brain lesion that occurs early in life with associated motor deficits which may result in lifelong disability. The brain has high neuroplastic potential early in life, stressing the importance for therapy. Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) including transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may enhance pediatric rehabilitation interventions through neuroplasticity.