Connecting research and clinics to help those with autism

One of the goals of the study is to discover how genetic variations in young people with ASD are related to brain changes that lead to clinical symptoms of the disorder, such as impaired social interaction and repetitive behaviors.

“If you think about it, in between genes and clinical symptoms [of ASD] are changes in brain development,” says Lainhart. “Genes first impact brain development, and as a result of changes in how the brain develops, there are clinical manifestations of what we recognize as ASD.”

Proposals by Waisman investigators selected for UW-Madison Cluster Hire Initiative

Several Waisman Center investigators played key roles in crafting research proposals that were recently selected as ‘cluster hires’ by the University of Wisconsin-Madison. UW–Madison’s Cluster Hiring Initiative was launched in 1998 as an innovative partnership …

Waisman research into rare syndrome offers hope for families

Laurel Cooper is 8 years old and full of sass and spunk. She finds it hilarious when her older sister, Annalise, gets into trouble. She loves music, and being in the thick of things. Cooper also has Rett syndrome, a rare, non-inherited neurological disorder that mostly affects girls and causes severe deterioration in their ability to speak, eat, move and even breathe easily. Rett syndrome has no cure.

Qiang Chang, PhD

Title: Cell cycle-linked MeCP2 phosphorylation modulates adult neurogenesis Legend: Representative images (left) of adult neural progenitor cells (aNPCs) isolated from wild type (WT) and Mecp2S421A;S424A/y hippocampus with BrdU pulse labeling, followed by immunocytochemistry analysis. (middle) Representative …