UW effort to map Down syndrome brain raises prospect of treatment for disorder

In a lab near UW Hospital, Megan Jandy grows stem cells from people with Down syndrome — 10 batches of cells, most in three-dimensional clusters, each batch featuring one group with the extra chromosome that causes the disorder and one group without it.

Genomics and genetics cluster hire brings expansion into new research avenues

Tiny but mighty is a good way of describing our genome – the collection of our DNA. Although not visible to the naked eye, the human genome holds around 21,000 genes and millions of DNA variants, containing the information needed to maintain an organism throughout its life.

New machine learning algorithm improves estimation and integration of single-cell data

Like a game of Wheel of Fortune, where you have to fill in missing letters to guess the hidden phrase, analyzing data sometimes requires estimating missing data points by relying on available information in order to get the full picture of what’s being studied.

Stem cell project to create new model to study brain development and Down syndrome

Waisman Center researchers are creating a new approach to study how changes to brain development in the womb result in intellectual disability in people with Down syndrome.

Daifeng Wang, PhD – Slide of the Week

Understanding cell-type-specific gene regulatory mechanisms from genetic variants to diseases remains challenging. To address this, we developed a computational pipeline, scGRNom (single-cell Gene Regulatory Network prediction from multi-omics), to predict cell-type disease genes and regulatory networks including transcription factors and regulatory elements.